5 Things You Didn't Know About Frank Sinatra

On December 12, 1915, Singer Frank Sinatra was born in Hoboken, New Jersey. He later became one of the most influential singers of the 20th century. Here are 5 shocking facts about the singer nicknamed “Ol’ Blue Eyes.”

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Sinatra Wasn’t a Fan of One of His Most Popular Songs While “Strangers in the Night” was one of Sinatra’s most popular songs, he personally despised it.  Frank called the song “a piece of sh*t” and “the worst f**king song I’ve ever heard.” He was not afraid to voice his disapproval of playing it live. In spite of his contempt for the song, for the first time in 11 years he had a #1 hit, and it remained on the charts for 15 weeks. Thankfully, he recorded the song anyway, not just because it topped the charts, but because, of the improvised skat at the end of the song...

Frank Inadvertently Helped Name Scooby-Doo The popular cartoon dog, Scooby-Doo, got his name from the scat Frank Sinatra improvised at the end of “Strangers in the Night” which ended with "Dooby dooby doo".  In 1968, CBS television executive Fred Silverman was inspired by the scat while listening to the recording on a red-eye flight to a development meeting for a Saturday morning cartoon show and decided to rename the dog's character to "Scooby-Doo". 


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He Had His Own Line Of Jarred Pasta Sauces Sinatra was definitely a foodie and introduced his own pasta sauce in 1990, which was based on his mother’s recipe. Although the sauce was a flop,  he released “The Sinatra Celebrity Cookbook” in 1996. The cookbook included recipes from Sinatra and other recipes from stars such as Katharine Hepburn, Kirk Douglas, and Whoopie Goldberg. You can still find Mama Sinatra’s recipe online.

An Asteroid Is Named After Sinatra In 1989, a new asteroid was discovered at the European Southern Observatory in Germany by E.W. Elst. He named the asteroid 7934 Sinatra after the famous crooner. The asteroid orbits the sun between Mars and Jupiter. George Takei also has an asteroid named after him. 7307 Takei was discovered on April 13, 1994, at an observatory in Japan and was named in honor of long-time "Star Trek" actor.

The Last Song He Performed Is Inscribed on His Tombstone In February 1995, Sinatra performed a short set of songs in his final performance after a career lasting 60 years. The last song he ever performed was “The Best Is Yet to Come." He sang this song to around 1,200 people in Palm Desert at the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Invitational gala. The words "The Best Is Yet to Come" was inscribed on his tombstone after he passed away in 1998.